6.5 carcano ammo For Sale | In Stock

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$350.00

Quantity:500 Rounds

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Category: Product ID: 3974

Description

6.5 carcano ammo Overview:

Before Buying 6.5 carcano ammo Online, it is good to get important informations about 6.5 carcano ammo.

Read This Content ammo below and you will get more information.

origin of 6.5 carcano ammo:

6.5 Carcano ammo refers to the type of ammunition that is used in firearms that are chambered for the

6.5x52mm Carcano cartridge. This cartridge was originally developed by the Italian military in the early 1900s,

and it was used in a variety of rifles and carbines, including the Carcano M91/38 and the Carcano M38.

The 6.5x52mm Carcano cartridge is a rimless, bottlenecked cartridge that uses a pointed bullet weighing between

123 and 139 grains. The cartridge has a muzzle velocity of around

2,300 feet per second and is known for its relatively mild recoil and accuracy at longer ranges.

Carcano ammunition is still produced today by a variety of manufacturers, and it can be found in both military surplus and commercial versions.

Military surplus ammunition is often corrosive and requires special cleaning procedures to prevent damage to the firearm. Commercial ammunition is typically non-corrosive and is designed for use in modern firearms.

It is important to note that the use of any ammunition should always be done with care and attention to safety.

Proper handling and storage of ammunition is critical to prevent accidents and injuries.

If you are unsure about the type of ammunition that is appropriate for your firearm,

consult the manufacturer’s recommendations or seek advice from a qualified firearms expert.

The 6.5 Carcano ammo is a rifle cartridge that was originally developed by the Italian military in the early 1900s.

It was used in a variety of rifles and carbines, including the Carcano M91/38 and the Carcano M38.

The cartridge has a bullet diameter of 6.7mm and a case length of 52mm, hence its designation as the 6.5x52mm Carcano.

It is a rimless, bottlenecked cartridge that uses a pointed bullet weighing between 123 and 139 grains.

The cartridge has a muzzle velocity of around 2,300 feet per second

and is known for its relatively mild recoil and accuracy at longer ranges.

The 6.5 Carcano ammo was used extensively by the Italian military through both World War I and World War II.

It was also used by other countries such as Finland and Romania.

Despite its military use, the 6.5 Carcano was not a particularly popular civilian cartridge and is now considered somewhat obscure.

Today, the 6.5 Carcano is primarily used by vintage firearm enthusiasts and collectors.

Ammunition is still produced by a variety of manufacturers, but it is not as widely available as more popular cartridges.

It is important to note that the use of any ammunition should always be done with care and attention to safety.

Proper handling and storage of ammunition is critical to prevent accidents and injuries.

6.5 carcano ammo:

Starting around 1928, Prvi  has been creating custom 6.5 carcano ammo in Serbia for rivalry, indoor reaches and major game hunting.

Delicate point ba delicate slugs include a delicate lead uncovered nose that make controlled extension and a uniform mushroom.

This ammo is new item, non-destructive , in fighter prepared , reloadable metal cases.

 

The 6.5 carcano ammo is  among the original of little drag, smokeless powder military cartridges

when it was embraced in its refined structure in 1891 by the Italian military.

Its round shot tended to tumble when it came into contact with … indeed, truly anything, yet the length

of the projectile gave long reach dependability to the objective. Furthermore, the standard burdens had

a discernibly more agreeable backlash than other standard rifle adjusts, in any event, when shot from the light

Carcano carbines made for the big guns and infantry units of the Italian military.

The 139 grain round nosed, full metal jacketed round by PRVI can leave the muzzle at up to

2526 ft per second with 1969 foot pounds of energy.

This is a round made ideally for target shooting with these handy little rifles.

There once was a time that only a few munitions makers would provide this caliber and they would

fetch a premium, which drove the price of these surplus rifles almost literally into the ground.

PRVI Partizan offers these calibers at a reasonable cost, especially considering they are even provided on boxer primed cases.

Offering commercial grade quality with military standards, Partizan has fast become a favorite among historical firearms enthusiasts.

 

history of 6.5 carcano ammo:

As far as Carcani are concerned, the chicken-and-egg question can be answered clearly: the 6.5×52 cartridge came first,

and only then a weapon was tailored around it. Incidentally, its rimmed predecessor, developed by Italian technicians

who heavily drew on Swiss experiments, probably was copied by Ferdinand Ritter von Mannlicher and lateron he presented

it to the world as “his” 6.5x53R Romanian and Dutch (the Brits called their Kynoch hunting loads “.256 Mannlicher”).
The first cartridge type, called M91 like the rifle, used a hot two-based propellant, Alfred Nobel’s Ballistite.

Not only was it erosive and rapidly ruined the rifle’s throats, but the Italian state also had to pay royalties to Nobel.

So, it is no wonder that a single-based nitrocellulose powder was soon invented, the all-Italian “Solenite”.

The cartridge was then called M91/95 and always retained this name.

The change was gradual, the last ball cartridges with Ballistite being produced in 1905/1906.

For special applications (such as blanks), Ballistite was retained.

The 6.5mm bullet diameter is used in a variety of rifle cartridges,

and there are several types of 6.5mm ammunition available on the market. Here are some examples:

  • 6.5 Carcano ammo: This is a relatively new cartridge that was developed in 2007 for long-range target shooting and hunting.
  • It uses a 140-grain bullet and has a muzzle velocity of around 2,700 feet per second. It has quickly become a popular choice for long-range shooters due to its accuracy and consistency.
  • 6.5x55mm Swedish Mauser: This cartridge was developed in 1891 for use in the Swedish military.
  • It uses a 140-grain bullet and has a muzzle velocity of around 2,550 feet per second.
  • It is known for its accuracy and mild recoil.
  • 6.5x52mm Carcano: This cartridge was developed by the Italian military in the early 1900s and was used in a variety of
  • rifles and carbines, including the Carcano M91/38 and the Carcano M38.
  • It uses a pointed bullet weighing between 123 and 139 grains and has a muzzle velocity of around 2,300 feet per second.

These are just a few examples of the 6.5mm ammunition available on the market.

It is important to note that different types of ammunition may have different uses and applications,

so it is important to choose the right type of ammunition for your intended use.

Additionally, always ensure that you are using the correct ammunition

for your firearm and that you are following proper safety procedures when handling firearms and ammunition.

In 1891, the Kingdom of Italy released a new cartridge that set a new direction for rifle ammo in the military. The 6.5x52mm Carcano became the first small bore cartridge to be accepted for service in the military, which lead to the development and adoption of other renowned cartridges – including the 6.5×55 Swedish Mauser and the 6.5×50 Arisaka.

The 6.5x52mm Carcano is a rimless bottleneck cartridge topped with a 6.8mm Full Metal Jacket or Soft Point bullet. Muzzle velocity is between 2,200 and 2,300 feet per second, and muzzle energy is about 1,700 to 1,800 foot pounds. The cartridge is effective for hunting deer and small game out to 250 yards.

The Italian military chambered the 6.5x52mm Carcano in the M91 rifle, which had a bolt action and performed in both WWI and WWII. The rifle had a reputation for poor quality and poor accuracy, not like other military rifles of the time, but the rifle did have one advantage – it had a loose action, enabling fast shooting. This was not enough to keep the rifles in service, and so the M91 was replaced by the M1 Garand soon after WWII.

Many M91 rifles have crossed the pond to the U.S. Some were carried home as war trophies by returning U.S. soldiers, and others were purchased as surplus arms from the Italian government. The M91 is the best known rifle chambered for 6.5x52mm Carcano.

The 6.5x52mm Carcano likely would have gradually faded into obscurity much like so many cartridges from the late 1800s and early 1900s, but this is not the case since it was used to assassinate President Kennedy in 1963. This did not lead to an increase in demand for the M91 rifle and 6.5×52 ammo, but it did keep the cartridge from sliding into anonymity.

There are very few manufacturers today who produce 6.5x52mm ammunition, and no major manufacturers of rifles sell a firearm chambered for this caliber.

6.5x52mm Carcano Ballistics: Chart of Average 6.5x52mm Carcano Ballistics

Note: This information comes from the manufacturer and is for informational purposes only. The actual ballistics obtained with your firearm can vary considerably from the advertised ballistics. Also, ballistics can vary from lot to lot with the same brand and type load.

6.5x52mm Carcano Bullet WEIGHT Muzzle VELOCITY (fps) Muzzle ENERGY (ft. lbs.) TRAJECTORY (in.)
Muzzle 100 yds. 200 yds. 300 yds. 400 yds. Muzzle 100 yds. 200 yds. 300 yds. 400 yds. 100 yds. 200 yds. 300 yds. 400 yds.
139 Grain 2580 2360 2160 1970 1790 2045 1725 1440 1195 985 2.5 0 -9.9 -29
160 Grain 2250 1963 1700 1467 1271 1798 1369 1027 764 574 3.8 0 -15.9 -48.1

 

7,35 x 51

This cartridge was designed after 1935, and first entered service in 1938, together with the new M38 short rifle variant.

Again, the egg seems to have preceded the chicken. Credit for the creation of this round (which is basically a necked-up 6.5×52,

the case of which has been slightly shortened during the necking up, just as the Swedish 7×54 and 8×54 semi-wildcats) is usually given to

Giuseppe Mainardi.
The reasons for the caliber change are still not entirely clear, and archival research will have to be conducted to answer the question decisively.

I think that the following conjectures are reasonable:

  • The 6.5mm cartridge with its heavy, ballistically disadvantaged roundnose bullet has a rather curved trajectory.
  • Considering that the battle sights of all M91 guns started at 300 metres, they would shoot too high at the closer distances
  • where most fire was conducted.
  • A flatter-shooting, faster bullet with a streamlined shape was needed.
  • This would also allow to do away with the perceived-obsolete adjustable rearsight (empirical research had found out about everywhere
  • that the soldiery did not bother to adjust their sights and would only hit their individual targets at close distances any how, (larger caliber)
  • machine guns being prefered for anything beyond 200 metres. Great Britain and Japan answered with the introduction of a peep battlesight,
  • while Italy chose a fixed rear sight notch which would be sighted in to 200 metres.
  • The introduction of the new cartridge must be seen in the context (and can only this really been understood)
  • of the modernization of the Italian army in the 1930s. The change covered a thorough re-structuring of divisions
  • (2 vs. 3 regiments) and well as the beginning (and large-scale planned) mechanization. In a mechanized, mobile army
  • (as the visionary thinkers of the Italian forces envisioned it, alas without the necessary funds and means),
  • the individual soldier’s sidearm would have to be short and handy (and not too heavy). A high-powered long-range cartridge,
  • as e.g. the German 8x57IS or the American .30-06 and the Russian 7.62x54R were, was not needed in an individual sidearm
  • … it just offered overkill, heavy recoil, and burned too much powder. You will certainly recognize the precursors of modern military thinking here,
  • the “intermediate” assault rifle cartridge. In fact, the Italians did indeed experiment with a shortened version of the 7.35×51 cartridge,
  • but development of this cartridge, and the gun to use it, was not persued. For long-range use and squad support,
  • the newly-developed heavy machine gun cartridge, the 8×59 Breda (a very powerful cartridge,
  • superior to most others except the Swedish 8×63) offered the necessary range and penetration abilities.
  • Indeed, if seen not abstractly in “ballistics tables paper comparison”, but as tailored to its specific use,
  • the 7.35×51 is still a very fine catridge; its instable bullet offers very good terminal ballistic performanceon soft (read: human)
  • targets (like the Britisk Mk. VII after which it was patterned), its recoil is moderate and it is quite accurate.
The 6.5×52mm Carcano, also known as the 6.5×52mm Parravicini–Carcano or 6.5×52mm Mannlicher–Carcano,
is an Italian military 6.5 mm (. 268 cal, actually 0.2675 inches) rimless bottle-necked rifle cartridge, developed
from 1889 to 1891 and used in the Carcano 1891 rifle and many of its successors.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE 6.5 carcano ammo

6.5 Carcano ammo, also known as 6.5x52mm Italian (aka 6.5mm Italian, 6.5mm Italian-Carcano, 6.5mm Mannlicher-Carcano) is a centerfire, rimless, bottle-necked, .268 caliber, rifle cartridge developed by the chief technician Salvatore Carcano at the Turin Army Arsenal in Italy. The cartridge was adopted by the Italian Army as the official service cartridge in 1890 for use in the Mannlicher-Carcano model 1891 bolt action rifle. Consequently, this cartridge is often mistakenly referred to as the “6.5mm Carcano” but, the term “Carcano” actually designates an entire series of rifles designed by Salvatore Carcano; not exclusively the 6.5 x 53mm Italian cartridge.

The 6.5 Carcano cartridge was relatively unknown in the U.S. until the end of WWII when military surplus dealers imported large numbers of Italian Model ’91 bolt action rifles for sale to civilian shooters. Consequently, the use of this cartridge is now fairly widespread. Both factory loaded and military surplus ammunition is usually readily available for sale in bulk and smaller round count quantities.

6.5 Carcano ammunition is very similar in appearance to the Mannlicher-Schoenauer in size, shape, and performance, the military round fires 162 grain, round nosed, full metal, jacketed bullet at muzzle velocity of 2,296 feet per second, for a muzzle energy of 1,902 foot pounds. Also, when loaded with soft point spitzer bullets instead of the military, round-nosed, full metal jacket bullet (FMJ), this cartridge makes an excellent round for hunting small to medium sized North American game species up to and including Whitetail Deer, Mule Deer, Antelope, and Black Bear.

Specifications of this ammo

Product Information

Cartridge 6.5x52mm Mannlicher-Carcano
Grain Weight 139 Grains
Quantity 20 Round
Muzzle Velocity 2526 Feet Per Second
Muzzle Energy 1969 Foot Pounds
Bullet Style Full Metal Jacket
Lead Free No
Case Type Brass
Primer Boxer
Corrosive No
Reloadable Yes
Velocity Rating Supersonic

what is 6.5 carcano ammo:

6.5 carcano ammo is a Smokeless powder military cartridges.

The 6.5 carcano ammo is among the first little drag, smokeless powder military cartridges when it was

embraced in its refined construction in 1891 by the Italian military.

Its round shot would in general tumble when it came into contact with … to be sure, really anything, yet the length

of the shot gave long arrive at trustworthiness to the goal.

Besides, the standard weights had a recognizably more pleasing reaction than other standard rifle changes,

regardless, when fired from the light Carcano carbines made for the serious weapons and infantry units of the Italian military.

The Catridge has a bullet Diameter of 6.5 mm and has a rimless and bottlenecked case.

The 6.5×52mm Carcano was designed as an infantry cartridge.

In accordance with the tactics of the time, the adjustable rear sight of the rifle allowed for volley fire up to 2,000 metres.

It has a standard bullet weight gain of 160 grains and muzzle velocity of around 2,200 feets per second.

 

The ammo is 52 mm long and the overall length of the arm is approximately 3 inches.

It is a centerfire catridge, which means that the firing pin strikes the center of the base of the caridge to ignite the primer.

The 6.5×52mm Carcano was the first to be officially adopted of a class of similar

smallbore military rifle cartridges which included the 6.5×50mm Arisaka (Japan), 6.5×53mmR Mannlicher (Romania/Netherlands),

6.5×54mm Mannlicher–Schönauer (Greece), 6.5×55mm Swedish Mauser

(also Norwegian Krag–Jørgensen), and the Portuguese 6.5×58mm Vergueiro.

The 6.5*52 mm carcano ammo is acceptable, with proper bullet,

for medium-size big game such as North American whitetail deer within 250 yards.

However, the standard Italian service round used an unstable round-nosed bullet with a propensity to tumble, whether hitting

soft tissue/ballistic gel or harder material such as bone

The 6.5×52mm Carcano, also known as the 6.5×52mm Parravicini–Carcano or 6.5×52mm Mannlicher–Carcano,

is an Italian military 6.5 mm (. 268 cal, actually 0.2675 inches) rimless bottle-necked rifle cartridge,

developed from 1889 to 1891 and used in the Carcano 1891 rifle and many of its successors.

The 6.5×52mm Carcano was designed as an infantry cartridge.

In accordance with the tactics of the time, the adjustable rear sight of the rifle allowed for volley fire up to 2,000 metres.

The 6.5×52mm Carcano was the first to be officially adopted of a class of similar

smallbore military rifle cartridges which included the 6.5×50mm Arisaka (Japan),

6.5×53mmR Mannlicher (Romania/Netherlands), 6.5×54mm Mannlicher–Schönauer (Greece),

6.5×55mm Swedish Mauser (also Norwegian Krag–Jørgensen), and the Portuguese 6.5×58mm Vergueiro.

synonym of 6.5 carcanoa ammo:

The 6.5x52mm Carcano, sometimes referred to as the 6.5mm Italian,

was developed in the 1890s for the Kingdom of Italy and used in both world wars as well as many other engagements.

6.5 Carcano ammo generally ranges from 123 to 156 grain and work well on deer at ranges up to 200 yards,

making it a formidable hunting round.

6.5 Carcano Ammo

As the Carcano evolved, there were different versions that took different sized ammunition.

There were three main types of ammunition consumed amongst all of the different types of Carcano.

6.5 x 52mm

Easily identified by its round nose, this is the ammunition required by most carcanos.

The gun was built with the intention to use this ammunition and many guns have been built to use this ammunition since.

This is the round that was purchsed by Lee Harvey Oswald and used in the assasination of JFK.

7.35 x 51mm

Designed for the shorter barrel Carcanos, the 7.35 x 51 was introduced to service in 1938

and was appreciated for a less curved trajectory than the original 6.5 x 52mm cartridge.

Other Ammunition

There are other Carcanos that take more obscure types of ammunition. Considering the different types

of Carcanos and numerous alterations made as time went on it’s considerably difficult to track all types of ammunition used by each variant.

For more complete information I suggest checking out this link:

Importance of 6.5 carcano ammo:

As to more general use, the 6.5×52 Carcano  ammo would make a superb deer cartridge,

while also useful on small to middle boar (with precise shots and premium bullets in 160 gr.)

The Carcano has a significantly higher fire rate and reload speed, which are usually more beneficial.

 6.5 carcano ammo is mailny used for hunting and shooting also in sports game. It is an effective bullet for hunting sized sports games such as deer and elk.

It is also used for long range shooting competitions and has an excellent flat trajectory and accuracy.

6.5 caracano ammo which allows for quicker follow up shots and less fatigue. It has an excellent accuracy due to its long narrow bullet design which

reduces wind drift and bullet drop. It also has a flat trajectory.

It has been designed to be a light weight catridge and it makes it easy for soldiers to carry multiple rounds.

Highlight of 6.5 Carcano ammo:

There was a time that only few ammunition makers would provide this caliber and they will fetch a premium,

which drove the price of these

surplus rifles almost to the ground.

Prvi Partizan offers these calibers at a reasonable price, especially considering they are even provided on boxed primed cases.

This ammo offers commercial grade quality with military standards, partizan has fast become a favourite among historical firearms enthusiasts.

Is 6.5 Carcano ammo still Produced:

Of Course Yes, several manufactures in the usa still produce this ammo.

What is the shooting range of a 6.5×52mm Carcano ammo?:

Effective range (ability to hit a man-sized target reliably) would be from

300–600 meters depending on the shooter.

Likely the carbine version would shade towards the lower figure.

As far as maximum range, any of these cartridges are capable of sending a projectile for miles at optimum elevation.

is 6.5 carcano ammo good for self production:

Most ammo you can find is a few thousandths off, which ended up giving the Carcano its reputation for being an inaccurate firearm.

The 6.5×52mm Carcano, also known as the 6.5×52mm Parravicini–Carcano or 6.5×52mm Mannlicher–Carcano,

is an Italian military 6.5 mm (.268 cal, actually 0.2675 inches) rimless bottle-necked rifle cartridge,

developed from 1889 to 1891 and used in the Carcano 1891 rifle and many of its successors.

Under the direction of the Commissione delle Armi Portatili (commission for portable weapons),

instituted in 1888, to develop a smokeless-powder rifle for the Italian Army, the Reale Laboratorio Pirotecnico di Bologna

(royal pyrotechnical laboratory of Bologna) developed and tried several different cartridge designs, with bullet diameters from 6 to 8mm.

Finally, due also to the influence of Major Antonio Benedetti of the Brescia Arsenal,

secretary of the commission and strong supporter of the advantages of smallbore cartridges,

the 6.5×52 cartridge was adopted in March 1890, prior to the adoption of the rifle that used it (the Model 1891 Carcano rifle).

The cartridge is acceptable, with proper bullet, for medium-size big game such as North American whitetail deer within 250 yards.

 However, the standard Italian service round used an unstable round-nosed bullet with a propensity to tumble,

whether hitting soft tissue/ballistic gel or harder material such as bone.

It has been found that the cartridge is indeed accurate   and the rifles were well constructed. Cartridge developers

and experimental handloaders such as P.O. Ackley found the rifle was able to handle excess pressure,

with even Ackley’s abuse “unable to break the action.”  A testament to the quality of the rifle and the cartridge.

6.5 x52  6.5 Carcano load is appropriate in rifles, however not in all carbines. When shot from rifle-length barrels (30″) this heap is a joy to shoot because of its unobtrusive backlash.

When terminated from carbines, this shot MAY not settle causing keyholing inside 30 yards.

There’s something intrinsically enchanting about exemplary rounds long-obscured by present day improvements in ammo, for example, .30/40 Krag, .250/3000 Savage, 6.5×55 Swedish Mauser and, surprisingly, the .300 Savage — the last option of which was once pronounced on paper to be a type deserving of just the garbage dump.

Tracing all the way back to 1891, the 6.5×52 Carcano is one more such cartridge, and one that has piled up a considerable measure of verifiable importance over the most recent 129 years.

 

  • 6.5 x52 in stock
  • 6.5×52 upgrade
  • 6.5×52 ammo Image Description
  • 6.5×52 carcano ammo Accessories
  • 6.5×52 carcano rifle Vedeo Description
  • 6.5 52 specification

CARTRIDGE HISTORY

A rimless, bottle-necked round, the was created for Italian infantry loaded in the M-91 rifle. Regularly stacked with a 162-gr. round nose shot, it was the main 6.5mm projectile in military help, however the slug breadth estimated nearer to 6.7mm. In any case, it’s initial aluminum nose generally expected made the shot tumble upon influence.

 

 

 

 

 

THE 6.5 CARCANO AMMO

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(6.5×52 ITALIAN)

The 6.5x52mm Mannlicher-Carcano is a charming looking bottleneck cartridge of unassuming limit. It has a rimless case with a .449″ head measurement. The case is 2.06″ long with a 24-degree shoulder. Shot size is standard 6.5mm (.264″). The cartridge generally speaking length is approximatley 2.90″. These aspects are dependent upon variety.

For the shooter with a Mannlicher-Carcano rifle with everything looking great, plant stacked 6.5×52 ammo and metal is accessible from Norma. Norma metal purposes standard enormous rifle Boxer groundworks, and is fantastic for reloading.

The Norma processing plant load for the 6.5×52 is stacked with a 156 grain Alaska shot at a gag speed (MV) of 2428 fps and gag energy of 2043 ft. lbs. At 200 yards the figures are 1926 fps and 1286 ft. lbs.

 

 

6.5 CARCANO AMMO UPGRADE

 

 

 

 

 

The “Best” method for doing that is to sell the 6.5×52 and purchase a 7.62×39 rifle.

Permit me to make sense of how you will have to treat “convert” such a rifle.

In the first place, and least demanding, amusingly… . is the barrel.

You will require another one. You should have a barrel clear molded outwardly to accommodate your stock, strung to accommodate your activity, chambered for 7.62.x39, and presently the REAL work starts.

Next you will have to change the bolt face, extractor, and conceivably ejector (however I think the ejector on the Carcano rifle is like the mauser, being fixed on the bolt stop, and riding in a space in the bolt).

You’ll have to ensure the bolt face is appropriately estimated for the 7.62×39’s edge, ensure the extractor appropriately holds the new edge aspects, and will dependably separate.

Then, about the time you’re tweaking the extractor to fit the cartridge, you tackle making the rifle’s magazine fit, feed, and capability with a cartridge that is; Smaller in measurement than the 6.5 (going from memory here, it’s not MUCH more modest as I review), has a MUCH more articulated body tighten and is about HALF as lengthy a cartridge.

You know how an AK’s magazine bends significantly more than, say, and M-14 or M-16 magazine?

That is a result of the 7.62×39’s body tighten. You will have to work (without any preparation) a magazine box that will hold and give taking care of strain to, your short, fat, minimal 7.62 cartridges.

You will have to either get the current feed rails of the Carcano to take care of, or fabricate new ones to suit, so the bolt can get a cartridge, the bolt can take it from the magazine, and afterward push it forward while the extractor caputures it, and the bolt habitats it in the chamber and locks home.

Best of luck with that. No, truly, Good karma with that. I’ve needed to attempt to get a P-1917 Enfield activity to take care of .300 Win Mag.

That was a maggot of a task (I actually have that fucking rifle… About one out of 10 adjusts STILL doesn’t take care of, and I’ve been fucking with it for quite a long time)… and know what? That is CHILDS PLAY contrasted with getting 7.62×39 to take care of in a Carcano.

There are little comforts I haven’t even referenced like ensuring the region of the bolt drags are adequate for the bolt pushed of the 7.62×39 (which is unique in relation to the chamber pressure), ensuring the terminating pin bulge is right, ensuring the headspace is right (that is actually essential for the chambering position, however you run into a chicken-or-egg when you’re likewise changing the bolt face)… And about six other “minor” errands.

Don’t bother the Old Soldier, and purchase a 7.62×39 rifle.

You will spend two times what you would on a reason fabricated 7.62 rifle as you’re going to simply on the turned barrel clear and a loading reamer…

To do it since you need to fiddle, I comprehend… But consistently recollect what you will wind up with when you’re finished; a rifle nobody yet you will need. In the event that you’re OK with that, take yourself out. Be that as it may, understand what measure of work this will be!

6.5 CARCANO AMMO IMAGE DESCRIPTION

 

 

 

 

6.5 CARCANO AMMO

 

45 70 brass
Offering steady and dependable execution, Starline® Unprimed Rifle Brass is great for home reloaders. Accuracy machined and cleaned, these metal housings guarantee reliable taking care of and extraction, and promptly acknowledge various execution ammo parts and powders.

6.5 CARCANO AMMO SPECIFICATION

 

Range (yds) Velocity (fps) Energy (ft-lbs) Trajectory (in)
                      –        1,770        1,113           (1.5)
                     50        1,645           961            0.9
                    100        1,528           830              –
                    150        1,420           716           (4.6)
                    200        1,321           620         (13.5)
                    250        1,233           540         (27.4)
                    300        1,158           477         (47.0)

RELATED QUESTIONS

What round is better, 6.5 x52, 5.45×39 or 7.62×39?

In a military setting, the 5.45×39 because:

  1. Its a lot lighter round, and that implies you can convey a greater amount of it (about two times more)
  2. It has a lot compliment direction
  3. In full metal coat structure (what militaries are permitted to utilize), its really intended to yaw before while affecting tissue, permitting it to punch way over its miniscule slug weight.

There is a motivation behind why the Soviets transformed from the 7.62 to the 5.45. The main benefit the 7.62 has is boundary infiltration.

For a regular citizen in the USA, HOWEVER, the 7.62x39mm is wayyy better:

  1. Ammo is far more accessible and less expensive. There are really homegrown makers of 7.62x39mm ammunition.
  2. Accessible ammo assortment is a lot more noteworthy. Finding any 5.45x39mm ammunition that is not mil-spec FMJ is remarkably difficult. You can track down a lot of 7.62x39mm softpoints, which are considerably more for compelling, and permit you to transform it into a respectable (and lawful) deer or pig hunting rifle.
  3. The quality control of the 5.45x39mm ammunition that is accessible is frequently sketchy. Fine for plinking, yet assuming that you intend to take your rifle to 2-weapon or 3-firearm rivalries that may be a responsibility. Then again quality 7.62x39mm ammunition is generally accessible, in the event that you will pay for it.

As a regular citizen shooter, on the off chance that you need an AK in a type that is lighter drawing back and compliment shooting than the 7.62x39mm, get one in 5.56 NATO. There are a lot of value suppliers out there, and you get all the advantage of the 5.45 with none of the disadvantages.

 

 

WHAT IS IN THE BOX 6.52×52 CARCANO

 

10 reviews for 6.5 carcano ammo For Sale | In Stock

  1. Vanammo

    These 6.5 carcano ammo is really great for hunting

  2. Vanammo

    Wow, very reliable service. Got my Product drop shipped at my door

  3. Vanammo

    MAN,gon order some more carcano ammo next week, they so great for wildgames

  4. Vanammo

    So great ammo, so sharp and shoot with no stress, y’all try this ammo

  5. Vanammo

    I’m really happy with their delivery service, they so great

  6. Vanammo

    ammoravine has being my ammo store for over 3 years now, i really enjoy their customer service

  7. Vanammo

    I first thought this carcano ammo is not good, i tried it with my brothers during hunting and it shot so fast

  8. Vanammo

    I love this ammo man, shoots like im in a movie, y’all try this 6.5 carcano ammo

  9. Vanammo

    Very good ammo for hunting

  10. Vanammo

    MAN, i got my 6.5 carcanoa ammo shipped at my door, shocking to know we got such reliable ammo service in united states

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